Goldilocks

  • Title: Goldilocks and The Three Bears
  • Author: James Marshall (retold by)
  • Illustrator: James Marshall
  • Publisher: Dial Books for Young Readers, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication year:
  • Brief Summary: From Penguin Random House-“‘What a sweet child,’ says a newcomer in town about Goldilocks. ‘That’s what you think,’ a neighbor replies. For Goldilocks is one of those naughty little girls who does exactly as she pleases, even if that means sampling the three bears’ porridge, breaking Baby Bear’s chair, and sleeping in his bed. “
  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library – As with several of the other fairy tales and folklore pieces I have covered for this project, I think this could be read while or after children learn the traditional tale (that has static characters/characterization, unlike in this book).
  • Whatever additional notes you’d like to add about this book and why you liked or didn’t like it –I wanted to read this book after we discussed it in class. I liked the humorous spin on the tale and the fact that Goldilocks is quite mischievous and independent. My favorite illustration is in the beginning when Goldilocks goes through the archway that literally says “Short Cut” with various (quite funny) signs that are warning her not to enter.

A Big Mooncake For Little Star

  • Title: A Big Mooncake for Little Star
  • Author: Grace Lin
  • Illustrator: Grace Lin
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication year: 2018
  • Brief Summary: From Little, Brown and Company-“Little Star loves the delicious Mooncake that she bakes with her mama. But she’s not supposed to eat any yet! What happens when she can’t resist a nibble?”
  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library –I found this lesson plan from Library Lessons With Books that gives resources for learning about the moon and the Mid-Autumn Festival that Lin mentions at the back of the book.
  • Whatever additional notes you’d like to add about this book and why you liked or didn’t like it – I was interested in reading this book after it was discussed in class but had to wait for a bit for a copy from my public library. I loved the whimsical illustrations by Lin done in simple colors of black, and gold with a black background on each page.

Strega Nona

  • Title: Strega Nona
  • Author: Tomie dePaola
  • Illustrator: Tomie dePaola
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication year: 1975
  • Brief Summary: From Simon & Schuster-“Strega Nona—“Grandma Witch”—is the source for potions, cures, magic, and comfort in her Calabrian town. Her magical ever-full pasta pot is especially intriguing to hungry Big Anthony. Big Anthony is supposed to look after her house and tend her garden, but one day, when she goes over the mountain to visit Strega Amelia, he recites the magic verse over the pasta pot, with disastrous results.”
  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library – I have covered many Caldecott winners and honor books in this assignment and I think it interesting which ones are kept in public libraries (I can’t speak on school libraries because I do not currently work in one). This one is an almost new copy from the public library I used. I think it is because there is still a valuable lesson that can be learned in this book. And the characters (though not diverse) are not blatantly stereotyping a culture or race. I found this lesson plan from Scholastic that includes using this book to help children understand cause and effect, and an understanding of texts.
  • Whatever additional notes you’d like to add about this book and why you liked or didn’t like it – The illustrations are done in subtle colors that I feel helps keep this book light and funny.

Cinnamon

  • Title: Cinnamon
  • Author: Neil Gaiman
  • Illustrator: Divya Srinivasan
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication year: 2017
  • Brief Summary: From HarperCollins-“A talking tiger is the only one who may be able to get a princess to speak in this beautiful picture book set in a mythic India. This stunning picture book will transport readers to another time and place and will delight parents and children alike.”
  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library – I think this book could be useful in evaluating different literary terms and characterization for an English class. I found this resource from Literary Curriculum that gives a small lesson plan.
  • Whatever additional notes you’d like to add about this book and why you liked or didn’t like it – While this fairy tale was imagined by Neil Gaiman, I am glad that he paired with Srinivasan for the illustrations, because they really take the book to the next level. I think my favorite illustration is of Cinnamon talking with the tiger on the pavilion. I did enjoy the bits of humor that Gaiman sprinkles in throughout the book.

The Lion & The Mouse

  • Title: The Lion & The Mouse
  • Author: Jerry Pinkney
  • Illustrator: Jerry Pinkney
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication year: 2009
  • Brief Summary: From Little, Brown and Company-“In award-winning artist Jerry Pinkney’s wordless adaptation of one of Aesop’s most beloved fables, an unlikely pair learn that no act of kindness is ever wasted. After a ferocious lion spares a cowering mouse that he’d planned to eat, the mouse later comes to his rescue, freeing him from a poacher’s trap. With vivid depictions of the landscape of the African Serengeti and expressively-drawn characters, Pinkney makes this a truly special retelling, and his stunning pictures speak volumes.”
  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library – I liked this version of an old Aesop fable and I think this version could be used in the classroom as children learn the “traditional” folk tales. I found this great discussion guide from Hachette Book Group to use with children after they have read this.
  • Whatever additional notes you’d like to add about this book and why you liked or didn’t like it –I was intrigued about reading this book when it was mentioned in class. I loved Pinkney’s choice of using onomatopoeia instead of words for this book. I think it allows children the opportunity to think about the story they are seeing and to make their own assumptions.

Just a Minute

  • Title: Just a Minute: A Trickster Tale and Counting Book
  • Author: Yuyi Morales
  • Illustrator: Yuyi Morales
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books
  • Publication year: 2003
  • Brief Summary: From Chronicle Books-“In this original trickster tale, Senor Calavera arrives unexpectedly at Grandma Beetle’s door. He requests that she leave with him right away. “Just a minute,” Grandma Beetle tells him. She still has one house to sweep, two pots of tea to boil, three pounds of corn to make into tortillas — and that’s just the start! Using both Spanish and English words to tally the party preparations, Grandma Beetle cleverly delays her trip and spends her birthday with a table full of grandchildren and her surprise guest. This spirited tribute to the rich traditions of Mexican culture is the perfect introduction to counting in both English and Spanish.”
  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library –I think this book would be perfect for teaching young children how to count up to 10 in Spanish as they learning this in English. Not only that but this is a folk tale from another culture that can be taught as children are learning about “traditional” European fairy tales.
  • Whatever additional notes you’d like to add about this book and why you liked or didn’t like it –Morales’s vibrant illustrations are whimsical and colorful and each page keeps the reader engaged. And she has rendered Senor Calavera in a way that children can see the humor in the situation, and not be frightened by him.

LonPoPo

  • Title: LonPoPo
  • Author: Ed Young
  • Illustrator: Ed Young
  • Publisher: Philomel Books, a division of The Putnam & Grosset Group (now a division of Penguin Random House)
  • Publication year: 1989
  • Brief Summary: From Penguin Random House-“With characteristic flair and energy, award-winning artist Ed Young illustrates the ancient Chinese version of the favorite fairy tale Little Red Riding Hood. Young’s vibrant, yet delicate, pastels and watercolors add drama to the deftly translated story.”
  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library – This is another one that I am not sure, due to its copyright of 1989, would be in a school library. However, if it were, it would be a good one to add with some of the other versions of fairy tales I have covered so far. This could be compared and contrasted, for instance, to Little Red that I just covered.
  • Whatever additional notes you’d like to add about this book and why you liked or didn’t like it – I was interested in reading this book after it was mentioned in class. The almost abstract illustrations lend to the fantastical setting of this fairy tale. As Ed Young was born and raised in China, this is a fairy tale that he himself heard growing up. As such, this is one of the few fairy tales (that I have covered) from another culture that is written (and illustrated) by a person from that culture.

Little Red

  • Title: Little Red
  • Author: Bethan Woollvin
  • Illustrator: Bethan Woolvin
  • Publisher: First published in Great Britain by Too Hoots, an imprint of Pan Macmillan, first published in the U.S. by Peachtree Publishers
  • Publication year: 2016
  • Brief Summary: From Peachtree Publishers-“Here, Little Red is no fool—she can tell the difference between Grandma and the wolf and needs no woodcutter to save her. With design and artwork as bold as the characters, Little Red is a dramatic read.”
  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library –This would be another fantastic book to use while children are learning about fairy tales. This version is unique and could be used after children read the original tale.
  • Whatever additional notes you’d like to add about this book and why you liked or didn’t like it – I liked this spin on the classic fairy tale. In this version, Little Red is not so easily fooled as her “traditional” counterpart. In this version, she needs no help from an outside force, such as the woodsman who generally saves the day in the classic tale. No, in this version, Little Red takes take of the wolf on her own, and in my favorite illustration in the book she wears his pelt back home.

Dust Devil

  • Title: Dust Devil
  • Author: Anne Isaacs
  • Illustrator: Paul O. Zelinsky
  • Publisher: Schwartz & Wade Books, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books
  • Publication year: 2010
  • Brief Summary: From Penguin Random House-“Swamp Angel has a reputation as the greatest woodswoman and wildest wildcat in all of Tennessee. But when she grows too big for that state, she moves to Montana, a place so sizeable, even Angel can fit in. It’s there that she wrestles a raging storm to the ground and, at its center, finds herself a sidekick—a horse she names Dust Devil. And when Backward Bart, the orneriest, ugliest outlaw ever known, starts terrorizing the prairie, seems like Angel and Dust Devil may be the only ones strong enough to stop him.”
  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library – Much like in Swamp Angel, I think this created folktale would be great to use in relation with other folktales as children are first learning them. In fact, I think both books would be great read back to back.
  • Whatever additional notes you’d like to add about this book and why you liked or didn’t like it – I mainly wanted to read this sequel because this was mentioned during class and I had read Swamp Angel during my first 100 picture book readings. Once again, Zelinsky outdoes himself with the vibrant illustrations. I think really my favorite set of illustrations are the ones at the beginning where Swamp Angel wakes up in her new home in Montana and moves some mountains to get some shade.

La Princesa and the Pea

  • Title: La Princesa and the Pea
  • Author: Susan Middleton Elyn
  • Illustrator: Juana Martinez-Neal
  • Publisher: C.P. Putnam’s Sons, an imprint of Penguin Random House
  • Publication year: 2017
  • Brief Summary: From Penguin Random House-” El  príncipe knows this girl is the one for him, but, as usual, his mother doesn’t agree.The queen has a secret test in mind to see if this girl is really a princesa, but the prince might just have a sneaky plan, too . . .Readers will be enchanted by this Latino twist on the classic story, and captivated by the vibrant art inspired by the culture of Peru.”
  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library – This book includes Spanish words intermingled with the English words and a glossary in the back so that children can learn these words. I think this would be a great book to use for young children as they are learning English and learning “traditional” fairy tales. Pair this book when discussing the original fairy tale.
  • Whatever additional notes you’d like to add about this book and why you liked or didn’t like it – The note from the illustrator in the back of the book was fascinating as Martinez-Neal was inspired by the embroidery and weaving of the indigenous people of Peru. Many of the patterns and garb the la princesa and el principe are wearing are inspired by these people. While the story is still the “traditional” princess and the pea tale, at least there is some welcome differences in this version, like the Spanish words added into the story, and the illustrations really add to that diversity. My favorite illustration is the two-page spread of the family at the end, with all their children (as many as there were mattresses), and la reina happily cuddling her grandchildren.